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  • HEALTHY LIVING

    All about diabetes

    4 min read

    Diabetes is a condition where people don't produce enough insulin, and/or their cells don't respond properly to insulin. Insulin is an important hormone produced by the pancreas that moves gluco...

  • HEALTHY LIVING

    Diabetes

    3 min read

    Diabetes is a condition where people don't produce enough insulin to meet their body's needs and/or their cells don't respond properly to insulin.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Nutrition and exercise to control diabetes

    3 min read

    Controlling diabetes means smart food choices to help keep blood sugar, weight, and cholesterol in better control and exercise usually lowers blood sugar.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Why exercise?

    1 min read

    Being active can help you maintain a healthy body weight and reduce your risk of certain conditions such as heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Exercise more

    4 min read

    Ten minutes here and ten minutes there of even just moderate exercise can add up to considerable health benefits.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Eating out when you have diabetes

    3 min read

    Our busy lives often prevent home food preparation. Dining at a restaurant or getting lunch from a take-out counter, it’s important to make healthy choices.

  • Helpful Resources

    • Diabetes and caring for your skin

      4 min read

      At some point in their lives, about 1 in 3 people with diabetes will develop a skin disorder related to their diabetes.

    • Staying positive with diabetes

      5 min read

      Managing diabetes takes up time in your day, but it shouldn't take up that much space in your mind. Read how to stay positive with this on-going challenge.

    View all resources

    FAQs

    • Featuring content from MediResource Inc.

      Diabetes is a condition where people don't produce enough insulin, and/or their cells don't respond properly to insulin. Insulin is an important hormone produced by the pancreas that moves glucose, a type of sugar, into the body's cells from the blood. Once inside the body's cells, glucose is used as a source of energy. If insulin isn't available or doesn't work correctly to move glucose from the blood into cells, glucose will stay in the blood. Blood sugar levels will then increase.

      In Canada, almost 2.7 million people have diabetes, and about 25% of those with the condition are unaware that they have it. According to the Canadian Diabetes Association, 4.2 million people in Canada will have diabetes by the year 2020.

      All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2021. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/Diabetes-Managing-Your-Condition

    • People with type 1 diabetes who are not being treated urinate frequently and feel excessively thirsty. They usually feel very tired and experience severe weight loss despite normal or excessive food intake.

      The symptoms of type 2 diabetes usually appear more gradually. People with type 2 diabetes who do not have their blood glucose under control often have a persistent, mild thirst. They urinate frequently, and often feel mild fatigue and complain of blurred vision. Many women with the disease have recurring vaginal yeast infections.

      Diabetes is a major cause of heart disease, one of the leading causes of death in Canada. It's also the biggest cause of blindness and kidney failure in Canadian adults. Older adults with diabetes are twice as likely to develop high blood pressure as people without diabetes.

      People with diabetes are 20 times more likely to undergo foot and other "lower extremity" amputations due to circulatory problems. Between 34% to 45% of men who have diabetes will experience erectile dysfunction at some point.

      All material © 1996-2021 MediResource Inc. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

    • The Facts

      There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. About 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which used to be called adult onset diabetes. However, more and more children are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes due to the rise in obesity.

      Some people do not have diabetes but also do not handle glucose as well as normal. This is called impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Up to 40% of people with IGT will eventually develop type 2 diabetes.

      Causes

      In type 2 diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin and/or the body does not use it properly. No one knows the exact cause of type 2 diabetes, but it's more likely to occur in people who:

      • are over 40 years of age
      • are overweight
      • have a family history of diabetes
      • developed gestational diabetes during a pregnancy
      • have given birth to a baby that is more than 4 kg (9 lbs.)
      • have high blood pressure
      • have high cholesterol
      • have IGT or impaired fasting glucose
      • are of Aboriginal, Hispanic, Asian, South Asian, or South African descent

      All material © 1996-2021 MediResource Inc. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

    • The facts:

      There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes develops when your body makes little or no insulin. When this happens, glucose can't get into the cells for energy and remains in the blood, causing hyperglycemia (high blood sugar).

      Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. Most people develop type 1 diabetes before the age of 30, but it can also occur in older adults. In North America, 5% to 10% of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. It occurs equally among women and men.

      Causes

      There is a genetic predisposition for type 1 diabetes, but the exact science behind the condition is not yet fully understood. There is also the need for certain environmental factors or "triggers" to be involved that lead to the condition.

      While the exact cause of type 1 diabetes isn't known, researchers believe the disease develops when a virus or environmental toxin damages the pancreas or causes the body's immune system to attack the beta cells of the pancreas (called an autoimmune reaction). As a result, the beta cells of the pancreas can no longer produce enough insulin.

      Without insulin, glucose in the blood can't enter the cells in the body and blood glucose levels rise. The body begins breaking down fat and protein for energy instead of using glucose for energy.

      All material © 1996-2021 MediResource Inc. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
    • Featuring content from MediResource Inc.

      Controlling diabetes is closely linked to diet and lifestyle.

      Healthy eating

      • Smart food choices help keep blood sugar, weight, and cholesterol in better control. Focus on fewer calories, and eat less fat (especially saturated fat). Enjoy more fresh fruits, vegetables, lean meats, fish, and legumes instead.
      • The amounts of fat, carbohydrate (fruits, vegetables, breads and grains) and protein (meat, fish, milk, nuts) you eat depend on your calorie needs and goals for weight control. A healthy diet usually includes 15–20% of daily calories from protein, 20–35% from fat, and 45–60% from carbohydrates.
      • Always read the labels before trying "low fat," "light," or "no fat" foods. Some of these specially-labelled foods are "dietetic" because they're sugar free. Others are lower in calories. Some mention that they're good for people with diabetes. But many diet foods that use sugar substitutes are high in fat and calories. Words like "light" or "low" can be deceptive. Try to read the fine print!
      • Just one alcoholic beverage on an empty stomach can lower your blood sugar drastically. Sip drinks slowly and always drink alcohol with food in your stomach. Limit yourself to no more that two drinks a day and be careful when consuming brandy, port, and liqueurs, which have high sugar content.
      • Enjoy sweets in moderation: People with diabetes don't have to avoid sugar all together. You can still enjoy a cookie, a piece of cake, or chocolate every now and then. Talk to your health care professional about how to safely incorporate sweets into your diet.

      Exercising

      • Exercise usually lowers blood sugar. It can help insulin work more effectively and improve your health and energy.
      • Ask your doctor about the right kind of exercise for you. Get a check-up if you're starting out, and avoid overdoing it. Gradually increasing your levels of physical activity helps prevent injuries while maintaining your enthusiasm to continue exercising.
      • Check blood sugar levels before and after you exercise. This helps avoid low blood sugar. Monitoring your blood sugar can help determine how different types of activities affect sugar levels.
      • Try walking, swimming, and light weight-lifting exercises for physical activity.

       

      All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2021. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/Diabetes-Managing-Your-Condition

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